.

Health

.

 

 

THE NORFOLK TERRIER BREED HEALTH SURVEY - RESULTS

Health Survey Report

Download

Health Survey Form

Download

 

 

.

.

!RESULTS OF THE GREAT NORFOLK TERRIER WEIGH-IN!

In 2013 we embarked on a project to weigh 100 Norfolk Terriers entered for shows run by the Club. To our knowledge this has never been done before, anywhere in the world. The project was initiated in response to numerous complaints from owners of Norfolk Terrier who were told that their pet dogs were overweight, when they looked perfectly fit. The breed weight charts in vetsí surgeries put both the Norfolk Terrier dog and bitch at 6.5 kg. And exactly the same figure for Norwich Terriers. This figure was suspect. As the results below show, Norfolk Terriers fit enough to show, were, on average, a different weight, and there was a greater range than was reflected on any weight charts we know of.

The Norfolk Terriers weighed included those from minor puppy (6 months, and older) right up to the veteran classes. This represents, therefore, the full age-range of dogs that may be presented to vets. We are fully aware of the fact that there are many reasons why two Norfolk Terriers of roughly the same size can be body weights that are very different. This is reflected in the figures.  
 
We encourage the use of these figures together with BODY CONDITION charts. These are easily available from your vet, or from the internet. Nothing, however, beats going over your dog with your hands: you should be able to raise the skin into a pinch easily; the dog has to have a distinct waist, which dips inward slightly when viewed from above; the back end of the sternum must be nearer the ground than the belly. These 3 tests, and the figures below, should tell you whether your Norfolk is overweight or not.

DOGS

Heaviest 10.30 kg
Average 7.30 kg
Lightest 5.30 kg

 

BITCHES

Heaviest 8.70 kg
Average 6.21 kg
Lightest 4.10 kg

 

This information is the copyright of the Norfolk Terrier Club of Great Britain. Any further publication requires the permission of the Club.

 

 

.

NORFOLK TERRIER HEALTH, CURRENT SCHEMES

The Health Snapshot      
The Health Snapshot is a survey of notable health problems that have occurred in individual Norfolk Terriers from all over the country. These reports are collated and assessed for any pattern of disease that may have developed.
It depends on people volunteering information about the disease, age, and sex of the dog. We do not require any breeding information at this point. To participate, all you have to do is contact Jill Stevenson on 01949 860251 or download a form here.
 
The DNA Bank
For only £5 you can have your dog’s DNA saved in our DNA Bank at the Animal Health Trust.
The test kits are available from Andre Hess. 
 
The Heart Auscultation Survey
Andre Hess will listen to your dog’s heart for murmurs free of charge. Any results are recorded and will contribute towards our data base.
Please contact Andre if you would like him to come and check your dogs’ hearts. He always has his stethoscope with him, and is prepared to travel (within reason!).
The Club depends on YOU to volunteer your dogs. Do not wait to be asked.

- Ten Signs Your Dog Needs a Vet by Andre Hess. Download

- Form to complete if your dog has/had health problems. Download

- Health Report by Jill Stevenson, AGM 2012. Download

- Help! Emergency! When to Phone the Vet. Download

- Heart Disease and the Norfolk Terrier by Dr David Connolly. Download

- Heart Testing by Andre Hess. Download

- A Guide to Help with Fading Puppies by Andre Hess. Download


.

.

.

The Norfolk Terrier Club of Great Britain

The Health of the Norfolk Terrier: an Interim Statement

        The Norfolk Terrier is one of the smallest terriers, with a hardy constitution.   A “demon” for its size, it is not quarrelsome and has a lovable disposition.
 
       The Norfolk Terrier is not known for exaggerated physical features of any kind.
 
       The Norfolk Terrier has no known breed-specific health problems and, therefore, no breed-specific health tests or schemes administered by the Kennel Club.
 
       The Norfolk Terrier Club of Great Britain is committed to assuring the continued good health of the breed.      It has invited its members to participate in a voluntary, informal research project to provide baseline data for use in future studies and comparisons with known data on heart disease in terrier breeds in general.   The scheme is outlined on the Club website.
 
       The Club is proud of its coverage of health and breeding issues in its newsletters and yearbooks.
 
       The Club organises an annual lecture, with priority on promoting the health and breeding of the Norfolk Terrier.

.

.

Contents

.

.

.